Ricardo Cobra SAS Light Strike Vehicle

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Ricardo Cobra SAS Light Strike Vehicle

2.00
  • Built for 22 SAS Regiment
  • One of only 6 known to be in existence
  • Comes with full maintenance manual
  • Perfect for any military collection
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The LSV was produced for the SAS during the lead up to the 1st Gulf war (Operation Granby),.The vehicles were rushed into service in the Gulf as an Urgent Operational Requirement (UOR). The SAS field-tested the LSVs during their pre-deployment desert mobility training, one of which was destroyed in a collision with a post on the runway on the first day of arrival in the Gulf. In the various guises produced Mk1, MkII and the MkIII just 15 examples of these highly specialised vehicles were produced and went into service but it is believed only six survive.

The LSV, or Ground Mobile Weapon Platform (GMWP) as it was designated by the Military of Defense, consisted of a tubular metal roll cage/metal space frame, to which its mechanical components were attached. The vehicle could accommodate 2 soldiers in side-by-side seating. A Vinghog softmount on the roll cage above the passenger station could accommodate a GPMG, HMG, or Milan anti-tank missile launcher. Side storage baskets run along the sides of the vehicles for stowing stores such as ammo boxes. A spare tire or other stores could be mounted on the bonnet. Sling points on the frame allowed the LSV to be transported by helicopter as an underslung load or secured in the hold of a helicopter.

This particular Light Strike Vehicle, which remains in excellent condition represents a fabulous piece of SAS war time history. Today it is civilian road registered in the UK and whilst offering great fun potential could also be used on a number of Military shows and events it would be a great alternative to a Land Rover on a country estate and would certainly turn heads if driven down the Kings Road in London!