1973 Porsche 911 Carrera RS 2.7 Touring

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1973 Porsche 911 Carrera RS 2.7 Touring

2.00
  • Exceptional matching numbers example
  • Delivered new to Germany in March 1973
  • Original colour scheme of Grand Prix White and Viper Green
  • Engine & Gearbox rebuilt 1,000 miles ago
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The Carrera name, now synonamous with Porsche first appeared after the firms resounding success in the Carrera Panamericana on the 356 model in 1955, it was subsequently revived for the 911 range in 1972. Due to changes in regulations, Porsche found their all conquering 917 racing cars redundant, and as a result went searching for a new competition challenge in the form of Group 4 racing, using a modified version of the road going 911 2.4S. Homologation required 500 examples to be built and sold, the result was the Carrera 2.7 RS (Rennsport). The biggest change was weight reduction. The body panels were made from steel that was just 0.7mm thick, instead of the standard 1mm. The engine cover and ducktail spoiler, were made from glass-fibre and the glass was replaced with thinner, lightweight Glaverbel windows. The underseal and soundproofing were removed, along with the passenger sun visor, glovebox, clock and the rear seats. The front seats were replaced with lightweight competition examples and the door cards were simply vinyl with a strap operated latch, functional window winders and a lightweight door pull. Mechanically the Carrera RS was modified for more power to compliment the loss in weight. The engine was enlarged to 2.7 litres and power increased to 210 bhp. New Bilstein dampers were used instead of Konis providing a further 8lbs weight saving!

It is rumoured that the sales department at Porsche felt there was no demand for a lightweight, competition focused version of the 911, and as a result all eligible executives were expected to take an RS as company car to help shift the stock. However, as history relates the poor judgement of the sales department meant this tactic was never implemented, just a week after the cars launch at the 1972 Paris Salon, all 500 units had been sold. In fact, the demand was so high that the board agreed to build 500 more, which sold just as quickly, and gave Porsche the 1,000 homologation units required to compete in Group 3 competition. Despite it’s huge popularity, there was strong demand for a more comfortable interior and as a result option M472 became available, which when ticked, gave the buyer all the mechanicals of the Carrera RS, albeit with a steel rear bumper and the more luxurious interior from the 2.4S. The Carrera RS 2.7 was a resounding success in the showroom and dominated in competition., in fact, the Carrera RS was the beginning of a competition career that today sees the Porsche 911 as the most successful sports car in competition history.

This fine example is car number 936 and was built in March of 1973 Delivered new to Germany in the extremely rare colour combination of Grand Prix White with Viper Green Carrera lettering and wheels the first owner is not recorded but Just 60 examples of the RS were built to this specification including Porsche’s own example in the factory museum. The car was sold when approximately ten years old to the well respected Miami dealer David Mohlman and subsequently sold to Dolores Lazzarin from Coral Gables in Florida. She kept the car a couple of years before selling it to John Kelly, an accountant from Fort Lauderdale. The car remained in his careful ownership for the next 30 years finally selling it to his close friend and Porsche restorer, Phil Bagley. Mr. Bagley immediately commenced a comprehensive engine and gearbox restoration overseen by Butch Stokes of Fort Lauderdale. Less than 1,000 miles have been covered since the engine and gearbox rebuild. The car has subsequently been imported back into the EEC with all taxes paid and is now registered for road use here in the UK. The car has also more recently benefitted from a full cosmetic restoration. This fine example of Porsches iconic RS 2.7 Carrera is also fitted with the ultra rare genuine Lightweight (M471) seats and door trim panels being a desirable deviation from its original specification.

This is a rare opportunity to acquire one of the most iconic cars in motoring history, a must in any serious historic car collection with all matching numbers in stunning condition throughout.