1955 Aston Martin DB2/4 Drophead

DB2-4 1.jpg
DB2-4 2.jpg
DB2-4 3.jpg
DB2-4 4.jpg
DB2-4 5.jpg
DB2-4 6.jpg
DB2-4 7.jpg
DB2-4 8.jpg
DB2-4 9.jpg
DB2-4 10.jpg
DB2-4 11.jpg
DB2-4 12.jpg
DB2-4 13.jpg
DB2-4 14.jpg
DB2-4 15.jpg
DB2-4 16.jpg
DB2-4 17.jpg
DB2-4 18.jpg
DB2-4 19.jpg
DB2-4 1.jpg
DB2-4 2.jpg
DB2-4 3.jpg
DB2-4 4.jpg
DB2-4 5.jpg
DB2-4 6.jpg
DB2-4 7.jpg
DB2-4 8.jpg
DB2-4 9.jpg
DB2-4 10.jpg
DB2-4 11.jpg
DB2-4 12.jpg
DB2-4 13.jpg
DB2-4 14.jpg
DB2-4 15.jpg
DB2-4 16.jpg
DB2-4 17.jpg
DB2-4 18.jpg
DB2-4 19.jpg

1955 Aston Martin DB2/4 Drophead

2.00
  • Lovely restored, matching numbers example
  • Ordered new by Scuderia Ferrari driver, Nano da Silva Ramos
  • 1 of just 102 produced
  • Build sheets and books on file
Add To Cart

Launched in 1953 the DB2/4 was based on the outgoing DB2. Whilst similar at a glance, on closer inspection the 2/4 demonstrated a more modern and cleaner design, thanks to features such as a wraparound windscreen, larger bumpers and a change in headlight position. Power came from Lagonda’s 2.6 litre dual overhead cam straight six, an engine designed by the great W.O. Bentley, who after an uncomfortable period under Rolls-Royce ownership, left his beloved motor car company to join Lagonda as Technical Director.  Power was a respectable 120bhp until 1953 capacity grew in 1953 to 2.9 litres and power was pushed up to 140bhp.

Offered as both a Saloon and a Drophead Coupé, the DB2/4 sold well and was particularly popular with privateer racing drivers. The DB2/4 not only frequented many a national race on both sides of the pond, but participated in a number of international events such as the Tour de France, Mille Miglia and the 24 Hours of Le Mans, the latter two including factory entries.

In 1957 the DB2/4 made way for the DB Mark III. After five years of production just 764 examples had been made, of which just 102 were Mark I Dropheads.

This particular example, chassis number LML/818 was delivered new to future Scuderia Ferrari racing driver, Hermano da Silva Ramos, a French/Brazilian racing driver who had started his racing career in 1953, racing a DB2 in the Tour de France. In 1954, he raced a privateer entry DB2/4 at Le Mans before becoming a factory driver for Gordini in Formula One, with his best result being 5th at Monaco in 1956. In 1959, Hermano (or Nano as he was known) was approached by Ferrari and after a few test sessions, was asked to join the team for the 1959 24 Hours of Le Mans, where he raced a 250 Testa Rossa with Cliff Allison.

Nano obviously had an affinity with the DB2/4 as the car that kicked off his career, and it is lovely to think that for this reason he ordered LML/818. It was delivered to him in Paris, finished in Imperial Crimson with Beige Connolly leather and a Black hood. According to the factory records, copies of which are in the history file, LML/818 had two additional owners in France, the last of which bought the car in 1988. Now finished in Masons Black, with the original specification Beige interior and Black hood, LML/818 has been subject to a thorough restoration and presents beautifully. She still retains her original engine and is accompanied with tools, owner’s manual, parts manual and a workshop manual.

A wonderful opportunity to acquire an important part of Aston Martin history with a fascinating first owner and in stunning condition.