1925 Riley 11.9HP Special Tourer

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1925 Riley 11.9HP Special Tourer

27,000.00
  • 1 of 2, original 2-Door Special Tourer known to survive

  • History back to 1948

  • Fully Restored in the 1960’s

  • Lovely patina with solid body and mechanicals

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The side-valve Rileys have an enviable reputation for reliability and built quality which is what you expect from a company that is ‘as old as the industry’.  The 11/40 was introduced at the 1919 Olympia Motor Show as a 10.8hp model but its popularity lead to an upgrade in 1925 to 11.9hp from the now enlarged 1645cc.  This was achieved by enlarging the bore from 65.8mm to 69mm raising the side-valve engine’s output from 35bhp at 3,200rpm to 42bhp at 3,600rpm.   

A number of bodies were available for the chassis including 2 & 4 door touring bodies, saloon, coupe and coupe de ville, among a number of others.

This 1925 example is finished in maroon with a grey interior.  Sadly there is no history for the car prior to WWII but it was reputedly pulled from a bombed out private garage in Bristol in 1948 by the first post war owner Max Williamson of Stroud.  He spent much time and effort restoring the car, making it a club concourse winner in 1958 before selling it in 1961 to Ken Gilling who subsequently sold it again to Peter Arnold in 1964.   Peter totally restored the car over the following years but sadly the car remained in the garage and never saw the open road until Simon Plant acquired the car in 2013.  The current owner bought the car from Simon in 2016 since when it has been used sparingly for local journeys.

The most significant feature of this car is the original 2 Door Sports Special body, only a small number of these cars were built by Riley and only 2 are known to survive.  The car has a delightful patina and is both structurally and mechanically sound.  The interior, hood and sidescreens are also in good order and the car is ready to go in every way.  The Auster ‘second’ screen remains with the car and is currently undergoing restorative work which will certainly add a sense of occasion when fitted.

The car’s performance is really rather spritely and it is certainly capably of keeping up with modern traffic – these cars were guaranteed to do 60 MPH in the 1920s and this car is certainly still capable of such speeds.

The car has a nice history file relating to its life since 1948 and it comes with its buff log book, current V5, various Riley club documents, letters, invoices and drawings relating to the car.  It also comes with 3 original catalogues for the model, the body range and an instruction book.

The car is a pleasure to drive, starts very well and I’m sure the Riley club and the VSCC would be delighted to have the new owner along to any of their events.

 

“The body is beautifully streamlined, with soft and graceful curves, which give it a decidedly speedy appearance that is entirely borne out by actual performance on the road.  A sloping ‘V’ screen is fitted, together with an adjustable glass rear screen, and this, in conjunction with the compact and close-lying hood, make up a strikingly handsome and refined looking car.” The Riley Special Touring Car from the Catalougue of the Car That Is As Old As The Industry.